Saturday, December 2, 2017

Really...they are friends

As for Ben vs the drone.  I used to see this kind of horn action a lot when there were wild longhorns loose around my property.  I find it particularly interesting that Ben instinctively knows how to use his horns without being taught by a herd.  Among other uses, their horns allow them to attain a stature beyond the compactness of their bodies to serve as a warning.  They are not used as weapons - but instead they are used in a species specific manner to push (not poke) and to hold or deflect an attack.  They are frequently used to hold their heads together preventing them from slipping off during a head to head trial of strength - the means by which they establish their place in the herd. (I established my place with Ben a long time ago.)  Horned cattle also exhibit quite specific grooming behavior - using them to scratch their backs or using the tip of another cow to scratch and clean their own eyes.  Each animal is acutely aware of the size and form of its horns and where they end.  Benita took it to the next level by using her horns to scrape the fruit off of prickly pear cactus, making them easier to eat without getting a nose full of spikes.  64,76,45,0,C

10 comments:

WhyR said...

Thanks for an erudite and informative look into the lives of Longhorns.

Margery Bills said...

Great. Someone should stick a horn up Prince Harry's butt. Just sayin' - only an opinion. Opinions are like assholes - everyone has one. He must have been on the bottom of the pool too long when he was a child - mental.

WhyR said...

My comment was meant as a sincere compliment. John has knowledge of these animals' behavior that could only be gained through extended observation. Thanks for sharing.

Rita B. said...

Sure wish the others were still roaming your property too. That was always fun to see. Hope the Cain's are doing well.

linda said...

Thanks,I never knew that about their horns. Loved Bonita!

pamit said...

They use horn tips of other cattle to clean their EYES? Lordy. Anyway, one thing I always notice about Ben's horns are how the upturned tips are asymmetrical, one going off at a slightly different angle. I wonder if that is an advantage.

Loved the Friday film!

John Wells said...

FYI...Ben is a little sensitive about his horn asymmetry...

John Wells said...

And the award for most bizarre segue goes to....Margery Bills.

pamit said...

Funny John!

Some birds (crossbills) have offset beak tips, making it easier to crack hard seeds. I wonder if longhorns' tip asymmetry could be like two knives held at different angles, when they are actually fighting or defending themselves.

CapnGimp said...

I followed your link last night and had a good few hours reading and watching videos, sometime after sunrise, I ran into ones of you paragliding...Needless to say, I didn't wake up until afternoon today. Do you ever ride it once in a while, recently? I'd love too, but when I sold my land in 2003, I got a big fancy telescope and a power chair with lift so I could use it instead of getting into paragliding. Hope to sell my scope to get my solar supplies in the next few months. Loving your adventures and the anminUleZ! God Bless you! Gonna get cold and snow tonight.